Published Articles

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Just as I was beginning to warm up to Vladimir Putin and the new emerging "democracy" in the Russian Federation (which like a phoenix rose out of the ashes of the communist Soviet Union), the Russian President and his minions in the Ukraine invade the Crimean peninsula and threaten to foment a second cold war! Who is Putin trying to imitate? Is it Peter the Great, who wanted the Russian fleet to have access to the Baltic, or Catherine the Great, who first conquered the Ukraine for access to the Black Sea? Or is it the more sinister Stalin, who first used Sochi as his private resort and, more ominously, helped start World War II by signing the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and invading Eastern Poland in 1939?

The imperialistic designs of Tsarist Russia in the 19th century and the murderous, authoritarian legacy of Joseph Stalin still seem to lurk in the shadows of the Russian nation with the consent of a large proportion of the Russian people.(1) Is communism, for all the assurances of Western journalists and academicians, truly dead, or still able to lift its ugly head behind the former iron curtain? The grim Russian authoritarian past does not seem to allow mother Russia to...



Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Suleiman the Magnificent — Scourge of Heaven by Antony Bridge is an engaging, but not exhaustive, narrative of the major events in the life and times of the great Ottoman Sultan Suleiman (r. 1520-1566). I was not disappointed in this book, which reads like a charming storybook. The tome is at times suspenseful, always informative, and frequently suitably illustrated, including excellent illustrative maps. I wanted to learn not only about Suleiman’s life and his position in the constellation of Renaissance rulers of this age, but also the interplay with other rulers and subordinates — and in that regard I was satisfied. This book is as much a sketch of the life of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V (r. 1519-1556) and a recollection of the treacherous exploits of Francis I, King of France (r. 1515-1547), as it is a biography of Suleiman. We must also mention the book contains vivid descriptions of the heroic defenses of the Knights of St. John in Rhodes in 1522, led by their Grand Master Philip Villiers de L' Isle Adam, and in Malta in 1565 after becoming the Knights of Malta, led by Jean Parisot de la Valette; the raids of the Barbary Coast corsairs in the Mediterranean and the...



Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Soldiers of Fortune — The Story of the Mamlukes (1973) is another undiscovered gem of a book by a scholar, historian, author, and soldier, a British Lieutenant General, Sir John B. Glubb (1897-1986), better known as Glubb Pasha by the Arabs he commanded in the Middle East in his many years of service while in the British army. The tome is a masterpiece of research on a topic little known to students of history — arcane, indeed, to most Western scholars and historians!

This tome is really a chronicle of the redoubtable Mamluks of Egypt and Syria, who ruled for 250 years, but whose accomplishments have all but been forgotten from the pages of history. Who were the Mamluks?

The Mamluks were Turkish or Circassian (i.e, from the north Caucasus) slave soldiers, bought in the slave markets of Ukraine, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and other areas of southern Russia. They were bought as children in the Islamic slave markets and brought to Cairo by the ruling class of Egypt where they were given military training to serve as mercenary slave soldiers serving the Ayoubid dynasty of Sultans (1169-1250). The Ayoubid dynasty, you will remember, had been founded by...



Saturday, February 15, 2014

The Galleys at Lepanto by Jack Beeching (1982) is a marvelous book, so well researched and mellifluously narrated as to read almost as a fairy tale or an epic romance of yore, elegantly scribed in poetic prose. Foremost among the knights-errant in this tale of chivalry is Don John of Austria, illegitimate son of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and half-brother of the stern King Philip II of Spain. The characters come to life as they are vividly described in the enthralling narrative, thus once begun, the tome is very difficult to put down. Intrigue, perils, and tales of heroism galore at Rhodes, Malta, and Cyprus await the reader before the denouement at the naval battle of Lepanto in 1571.

We also learn about the main protagonists and their characters and the shaping events in their lives — Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, Pope Pius V, Grand Master and Knight of Malta, Jean de la Valette, and the uncharacteristic childhoods of King Philip II of Spain and his half-brother Don John of Austria, as well the dispositions of their main adversaries, Ottoman Sultans Suleiman the Magnificent and his depraved son, Selim II “the Sot”, their Grand Viziers, and the Barbary Coast corsairs...



Monday, February 10, 2014

There is a Cuban proverb that reads: Dime con quien andas y te dire quien eres, which roughly translates: "Tell me who your friends are, and I will tell you who you are." For those who have not studied the issues and ramifications of convening a Constitutional Convention, now referred to as "Convention of States" to make it more palatable to state rights conservatives, the Cuban refrain should ring bells of concern. The Left has brought forth this issue numerous times. Most memorable was the effort by liberal economics Professor Rexford Tugwell (1891-1979), an FDR "Brain Trust" member, suspected American communist, and internationalist known for his global planning strategies. Prof. Tugwell helped draft a new more statist, model constitution for the United States giving power to the federal government for economic planning. He hoped to bring about a Constitutional Convention to make his scheme a reality between 1945-1948. There was even a novel written featuring Tugwell being elected President of the United States after FDR! God help us!

More recently a Harvard Conference was convoked in 2011 calling for a Constitutional Convention to attract Tea Party...



Monday, February 3, 2014

Stalin's Secret Agents — The Subversion of Roosevelt's Government was written by two experienced authors and recognized authorities on the Cold War, M. Stanton Evans and Herbert Romerstein. Evans is a veteran journalist and former broadcaster, as well as the author of Blacklisted by History (2009), a biography of Senator Joseph McCarthy, and other momentous books. Romerstein was the former head of the Office to Counter Soviet Disinformation at the U.S. Information Agency and a congressional staffer of the House Intelligence Committee. These two men have collaborated in writing a magnificent and shocking exposé that has been crying out for exposure — to inform as well as to correct and augment the incomplete and distorted historic record, not to mention reveal the true moral standing of a number of Americans who betrayed the nation for a perverted and venal ideology based on lies.

The importance of this book is that it not only exposes the penetration of the U.S. government by full-fledged Soviet spies but also documents the subversion by communist "agents of influence" subservient to Stalin and the USSR high up in the FDR administration. This is a inimical tale of...



Saturday, February 1, 2014

John Quincy Adams (2012) by Harlow Giles Unger is a well written and well-researched book that brings to light the sixth president of the United States, and the only son of a Founding Father to become president — John Quincy Adams. The Adams family was not only to give birth to several American statesmen, but also men of letters, diplomats, politicians, historians, and famous Americans — among them the Harvard educator Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886) and his sons, the novelist Henry Adams (1838-1918), and the historian Charles Francis Adams II (1835-1915).

After reading Unger's previously published book about James Monroe (The Last Founding Father, 2009), I reset Monroe in a higher pedestal from that in which I had previously placed him, from my knowledge of his life and American history, and from having read W.P. Creeson's  masterpiece, James Monroe (1946). I was disposed to believe the same about John Quincy Adams. But that was not to be the case. This was not due to the author's abilities as a writer or historian; Unger did a magnificent job as a biographer in this book. The problem was I learned more about John Quincy Adams that I previously did not know, and...



Wednesday, January 29, 2014

The Last Founding Father — James Monroe and a Nation's Call to Greatness by Harlow Giles Unger (2009) is a well written and eloquently narrated book that goes a long way to accomplish what it set out to do — to make James Monroe, not only the last Founding Father, but also the greatest of the founders, second only to George Washington.

This tome then fulfills in many ways what various eminent authors have set out to do for the most illustrious of the Founding Fathers, to place them on the pedestals where they belong, but from where they have been gradually demoted by the neglect of many academic institutions of higher learning, not to mention, the public education system. I refer to the following masterful biographies: Ralph Ketcham's  James Madison (1971); Willard Sterne Randall's Alexander Hamilton: A Life (2003); Ron Chernow's Alexander Hamilton (2004); David McCullough's John Adams (2001); and the forgotten masterpiece, W.P. Creeson's James Monroe (1946), among others. These biographies enshrine the notable careers of the founders, as men of flesh and blood, who without vacillation, pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor for the fledging...



Monday, January 13, 2014

Moghul by Alan Savage, a pseudonym for a prolific British novelist, is a historic novel of adventure, sex, and brutality of epic proportions. As with Ottoman, Alan Savage's previous dazzling adventure tome, this novel concerns and revolves around a fictitious (and not quite) renegade English family of male descendants, the Blunts, who while preserving some of their English identity through several generations, nevertheless, serve faithfully the ruling Moghul dynasty of Northern India (Hindustan) and Afghanistan. The time span is close to that of the chronicles of Savage's previous novel, Ottoman, a time period concurrent with the late Renaissance in the West (spanning the late 15th through the early 17th centuries) with which Savage seems to be quite conversant.

Savage is also intimately familiar with the very early Renaissance of 14th century Italy, as noted in his subsequent masterpiece, Queen of Night (1993). All of these books are full of adventure, intrigue, betrayals, wars, sex and violence, and are not meant for readers with delicate sensitivities and prone to easily take offense. Women in our present zeitgeist may not appreciate Savage's portrayal of women as...



Friday, January 3, 2014

Case Closed — Lee Harvey Oswald and the Assassination of JFK by Gerald Posner is the definitive book on the JFK assassination. Case Closed is duly named as an authoritative and definitive treatise on the subject. The book is well investigated, well written, and thoroughly convincing because of the meticulous research and persuasive, logical narrative of the accomplished author Gerald Posner, a former Wall Street lawyer. Instructive graphs and photos adroitly illustrate the narrative. Posner's book is simply magnificently written, from the very beginning to the end. After interviewing hundreds of witnesses, including numerous experts and even published authors of JFK assassination conspiracy books, and citing extensively the Warren Commission Report and other primary government documents, Posner draws a persuasive argument that Lee Harvey Oswald was the sole assassin of JFK. Oswald was a committed Marxist, as well as a lonely, disturbed individual with the political motivation and growing militant hostility to commit the heinous crime. Posner proves beyond a reasonable doubt Oswald was indeed fully competent and capable of carrying out the assassination, alone and unaided by...





Fransini Giraldo is a Colombian girl who dances her own style of Salsa. In this video, she dances to the rhythm of Sonora Carruseles de Colombia, presumably in the Colombia countryside. Published July 16, 2013.