medical care

Running for Cover — The Herd Instinct Among Physicians

Author: 
Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Summer 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
2

If you asked most physicians in the past what one thing characterized their profession, the most likely answer would have been fierce independence. Unfortunately, this is no longer the case. We have been and continue to be battered from an all-out assault of collectivist forces that infest our society and the legal profession that drains our substance. As a result of this assault, we have become daunted — lot, leaderless, frightened, and overwhelmed with a sense of helplessness and doom in the face of sundry forces working tirelessly to affect our demise.

Medical Practice Today: How Did We Get Here? (Part I)

Author: 
John R. Hilsabeck, MD, FACS
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Summer 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
2

It has been said that families go “from overalls to overalls in three generations.” It has taken doctors a little longer than that. During the time of the Romans, doctors were of the slave class. At the time of the Industrial Revolution, as portrayed in George Eliot’s novel Middlemarch, doctors took their orders from the bankers and town councils. How far are we from that today? We are being referred to now, not as doctors, but as “health care providers,” a classification which also includes bedpan salesmen.

RE: A Lesson from the Raintree

Author: 
Nathaniel S. Lehrman, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Winter 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
1

Dear Editor,

Dr. Michael L. Nahrwold’s “A Lesson from the Raintree” (Medical Sentinel, Summer 1996) is excellent, and particularly relevant to me. Ross Lockridge’s 1947 novel Raintree County is indeed one of America’s greatest novels, ranking, in my view, alongside Huckleberry Finn. Larry Lockridge’s recent examination of his father’s life, and his suicide immediately after the novel’s appearance, when the world seemed within his hand, is also excellent, as Dr. Nahrwold points out.

Medical Practice Today: How Did We Get Here? (Part II)

Author: 
John R. Hilsabeck, MD, FACS
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Fall 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
3

In Part I of this essay published in the Medical Sentinel, Summer 1996 issue, I discussed three of the seven enemies of the practice of medicine: Non-profit Hospitals/Hospital Administrators, Compulsory National Health Care Consortium, and Government Legislation and Implementation.

To the Tune of Washington's Pied Pipers

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Fall 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
3

In A.D. 1212, a Children's Crusade was formed allegedly
to rescue the Holy Sepulcher. Instead, the children were
lured and sold into slavery by unscrupulous and cruel
traders. Thousands of innocent children died of hunger
and disease and from their brutal ordeal. It is said that
the legend of the Pied Piper of Hamelin, who led
the children by the tune of his pipe,
derives from this dreadful affair.

AIDS --- Inventing a Virus?

Author: 
Peter H. Duesberg, PhD
Article Type: 
Commentary
Issue: 
Summer 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
3

"AIDS: The Untold Story" by Stanley K. Monteith is not exactly what it claims to be. It is hardly an untold story that by the end of 1996 over 500,000 Americans had developed AIDS, and that a million Americans would "progress to terminal-stage illness and death," because they have antibodies against HIV.

AIDS --- A Heterosexual Epidemic?

Author: 
Michael Fumento
Article Type: 
Commentary
Issue: 
Summer 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
3

Dr. Stanley Monteith has a long and distinguished history of being wrong about AIDS epidemiology, and his latest contribution to the Medical Sentinel continues the tradition.

AIDS: The Untold Story

Author: 
Stanley K. Monteith, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Summer 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
3

It has been said that "men become accomplices to those tragedies which they fail to oppose." Nowhere is that truth more clearly demonstrated than in the apocalypse currently unfolding across the world as the HIV epidemic continues its silent spread from land to land.

Pain

Author: 
Otto Scott
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
July/August 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
4

Advances in the conquest of pain are underway, we are told, in Europe, England and the U.S. Pain clinics and pain specialists are increasing, as are hospices and pain-management courses in medical schools. This sounds wonderful, but the reality does not seem as wonderful as the labels. Our check into these facilities and their methods indicate that they seem dedicated more to teaching people to endure pain than to efforts to alleviate it.

The Medical Sentinel --- A Breath of Fresh Air

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., M.D.
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
May/June 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
3

A History of Censorship

Mycoplasmal Infections in Chronic Illnesses: Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndromes, Gulf War Illness, HIV-AIDS and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Author: 
Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, Marwan Y. Nasralla, PhD, Joerg Haier, MD, PhD, Robert Erwin, MD, Nancy L. Nicolson, PhD, Richard Ngwenya, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
September/October 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
5

ABSTRACT Invasive bacterial infections are associated with several acute and chronic illnesses, including: aerodigestive diseases such as Asthma, Pneumonia, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; rheumatoid diseases, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA); immunosuppression diseases such as HIV-AIDS; genitourinary infections and chronic fatigue illnesses such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Gulf War Illnesses (GWI).

Food Additive Excitotoxins and Degenerative Brain Disorders

Author: 
Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
November/December 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
6

There are a growing number of clinicians and basic scientists who are convinced that a group of compounds called excitotoxins play a critical role in the development of several neurological disorders including migraines, seizures, infections, abnormal neural development, certain endocrine disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, learning disorders in children, AIDS dementia, episodic violence, lyme borreliosis, hepatic encephalopathy, specific types of obesity, and especially the neurodegenerative diseases, such as ALS, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and olivo

The Nazi War on Tobacco and Cancer

Author: 
W. Patrick Flanagan, Jr., MD, FACS
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Spring 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
1

Dear Editor,
In your excellent review of Robert N. Proctor's book, The Nazi War on Cancer (Medical Sentinel, November/December 2000), you postulate that the drop-off in stomach cancer in the earlier 20th Century was possibly related to better methods of meat curing and preservation.

Corporate Socialized Medicine Threatens Medical Profession

Journal/Website: 
Human Events
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Friday, August 15, 1997

Despite all the media hullabaloo about a growing medical marketplace and the supposedly conservative changes being brought about by the November 1994 Republican revolution, corporate socialized medicine is making headway and becoming a reality, step-by-step, under the rubric of managed care and a mislabeled "free market."

The fact is we still face an ominous threat from those who seek to destroy the noble profession of medicine, enslave the healers, and dispose of those whose quality of life they deem not worth living.

Book Review: The Nazi War on Cancer by Robert N. Proctor

Journal/Website: 
The Freeman--Ideas on Liberty
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Sunday, October 1, 2000
Source: 
http://www.thefreemanonline.org/departments/book-review-the-nazi-war-on-cancer-by-robert-n-proctor/

The Nazi War on Cancer by Robert N. Proctor is a deeply disturbing book for it describes in a good light what the author calls "the lesser-known 'flipside' of fascism-the side that gave us struggles against smoking, campaigns for cleaner food and water, for exercise and preventive medicine."



Fransini Giraldo is a Colombian girl who dances her own style of Salsa. In this video, she dances to the rhythm of Sonora Carruseles de Colombia, presumably in the Colombia countryside. Published July 16, 2013.