religion

America: a Christian country, a Judeo-Christian country, a secular country, or whatever? by David C. Stolinsky, MD

Journal/Website: 
Stolinsky.com
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Monday, January 18, 2016

Some time ago, the ACLU threatened to sue to force Los Angeles County to remove the tiny cross from its seal. You can see it if you look very closely. The cross represented the Franciscan missions, an integral part of California history. The mere threat of a suit frightened the county into removing the cross. A group of us filed suit to restore it. We lost, but at least we tried.

Symposium — An anti-Christian barrage in the midst of the Middle Georgia Bible Belt? (With apology to Alexander Pope)

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for Hacienda Publishing
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Monday, January 18, 2016

SoupI had a friend with an odd sense of humor. As he greeted guests at the door, he would yell over his shoulder to his wife, "Put more water in the soup!" Of course, there was always more than enough food. It was his way of bringing a smile to his guests' faces. But for some people, putting more water in the soup isn't a joke — it's a fact.

Religious morality in Western civilization — Part II: Secular man needing no religious guidance?

It has been argued that secular (non-religious) individuals and organizations display highly moral standards without belief in god or religion. Admittedly, this is true as far as organizations, such as Doctors Without Borders, but not necessarily true of the individuals who actually do the work, many of them are quiet or religious people operating with compassion under religious morality. These humanitarians keep their religion to themselves, although they might be working under the umbrella of a secular organization.

Religious morality in Western civilization — Part I: The twin pillars of the West

In the course and development of Western culture, the Judeo-Christian and the Graeco-Roman heritages became inextricably entwined becoming the twin pillars of Western civilization that have withstood the test of time. With the Hebrew experience, the Ten Commandments, the Old Testament, man was seen as having free will and having the capacity to do good or evil — i.e., develop moral conduct, for which he would be rewarded or punished in the afterlife.

Dr. Miguel Faria responds to Mr. N.M. Cullinan's letter in the Macon Telegraph

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Letter to the Editor
Published Date: 
Saturday, September 5, 2015

On Dismantling Christianity and the musings of Dr. Bill Cummings — False assumptions or deliberate misinterpretations?

Religious morality (and secular humanism) in Western civilization as precursors to medical ethics: A historic perspective

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Abstract — In discussing bioethics and the formulation of neuroethics, the question has arisen as to whether secular humanism should be the sole philosophical guiding light, to the exclusion of any discussion (or even mention) of religious morality, in professional medical ethics. In addition, the question has arisen as to whether freedom or censorship should be part of medical (and neuroscience) journalism.

Is the Catholic Church and the Vatican popes responsible for pedophilia as well as female genital mutilation?

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Saturday, April 11, 2015

Recently, I had a conversation with my colleague Dr. Zrinzo, who you will remember conversed with me on the subject of "America's gun culture." The conversation in fact continued, and the subject of "female genital mutilation" (FGM) came up. This time Dr. Z blamed the three monotheistic religions, particularly the Catholic faith. I thought this edited portion of the conversation would also be of interest and instructive.

Faria: Is 'the only good church a burned-down church'?

Dr. Bill Cummings is a successful executive CEO as well as a former Catholic priest, whose stint in the church over 50 years ago apparently left a scar, or rather a spiritual wound that refuses to heal. Following Dr Cummings' last column, Jim Sandefur of Lizella posted the following comment on the online version of The Telegraph:

A history of medicine from a secular humanist perspective!

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Friday, March 20, 2015

The Story of Medicine by Victor Robinson, MDThe Story of Medicine by Victor Robinson, M.D. The New Home Library, New York; 1943. Bibliographical Notes, Indexed, 564 pages.

The World — Socio-economics and Politics: 2015 update by James I. Ausman, MD, PhD

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Dr. James I. AusmanSix years ago I was asked to address the Western Society of Neurosurgery comparing the candidates for President Barack Obama and John McCain. I was very blunt, but analytical about both, but my comments about Obama were not well received by the liberal audience. Unfortunately, what I said has come true. But people will forget that also. The same has happened with the socio-economic/political paper I wrote. It has all come true.(1)

FARIA: Religion and civil discourse in The Telegraph

I want to thank both Douglas Harden and Dr. Bill Cummings for conducting such an informative and clarifying civil discussion on Catholic Church dogma and cannon law. I appreciate their sharing ecclesiastical knowledge as well as their civility. I'm sorry that this debate went over the heads of some frivolous "opiners," who dismissed it with atheistic contempt. It is an interesting but telling observation that keen observers will notice over and over: Why are atheists so preoccupied with God, denying monotheistic religion, and in deriding people of faith?

Suleiman the Magnificent and His Time

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Suleiman the Magnificent — Scourge of Heaven by Antony Bridge is an engaging, but not exhaustive, narrative of the major events in the life and times of the great Ottoman Sultan Suleiman (r. 1520-1566). I was not disappointed in this book, which reads like a charming storybook. The tome is at times suspenseful, always informative, and frequently suitably illustrated, including excellent illustrative maps.

From the Heroism of the Knights of Malta (1565) to the Victory at the Battle of Lepanto (1571)

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Saturday, February 15, 2014

The Galleys at Lepanto by Jack Beeching (1982) is a marvelous book, so well researched and mellifluously narrated as to read almost as a fairy tale or an epic romance of yore, elegantly scribed in poetic prose. Foremost among the knights-errant in this tale of chivalry is Don John of Austria, illegitimate son of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and half-brother of the stern King Philip II of Spain. The characters come to life as they are vividly described in the enthralling narrative, thus once begun, the tome is very difficult to put down.

From Babur to Aurangzeb — India under the Moghuls

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Monday, January 13, 2014

Moghul by Alan Savage, a pseudonym for a prolific British novelist, is a historic novel of adventure, sex, and brutality of epic proportions.

Spying from the belly of the beast in the Revolutionary Guards of Iran

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Sunday, December 1, 2013

A Time to Betray — The Astonishing Double Life of a CIA Agent Inside the Revolutionary Guards of Iran by Reza Kahlili is one of the most heartrending and enthralling accounts I have ever read of courage, dissimulation, and personal suffering in tA Time To Betrayhe genre of espionage memoirs.

Separation of Church and State — Worshipping at the Government Altar of Civil Religion

Recent Macon Telegraph articles and Letters to the Editor continue to discuss "separation of church and state," but frankly, many of them miss the mark. Our Founding Fathers, even Thomas Jefferson, meant something completely different in the "establishment of religion" clause of the First Amendment to the Constitution than what liberal pundits are leading us to believe.

Separation of Church and State — Worshipping at the Altar of Secular Civic Religion?

Journal/Website: 
Hacienda Publishing and GOPUSA
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Thursday, April 19, 2012

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press;
or the right of the people peaceably to assemble,
and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances”
— First Amendment in the Bill of Rights

Philosophic Ramblings (Part II): Religion and Politics

Since the heyday of Billy Graham in the 1950s to the 1980s, Protestantism has evolved mostly to become silent on secular issues or to speak only to promulgate politically correct (PC) proclamations depending on the trendy issues of the day. 

On the Spanish Inquisition and the Crusades

I apologize in advance to those here who have already assiduously learned these Medieval history lessons and find them redundant in their intellectual ordnance. If you already know about the Inquisition, the Crusades — and their historic relationship to Western civilization, please skip this post!

Religion as the Opiate of the People?

Recently, as if on cue, I have noticed liberal jabs at religion of a peculiar nature. It is as if, from the coldness of his tomb, Karl Marx (photo, below) was inciting these little jabs by his latter day disciples to prop up yet another aspect of his failing communist (socialist) philosophy, a philosophy that refuses to die.

Morality, Religion, and Natural Law

Author: 
Nathaniel S. Lehrman, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Summer 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
3

Dear Editor,

Dr. Jane M. Orient’s emphasis on morality’s importance in medicine (Medical Sentinel, Spring 1997) is characteristically on target. Her reminding us that religion created that morality is also vitally important. But she may err in seeing that morality as based on objective “natural law” rather than on something quite different: objective, religiously- and historically-defined Moral Law.

Why the Decline in American Education (and Morals)

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Winter 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
1

Is Insufficient Spending the Culprit?

Onward To Obscurantism!

Author: 
Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

*This article is excerpted from the Foreword of Dr. Prioreschi's latest volume (Vol. III --- Roman Medicine) of his A History of Medicine, released this year.(1)

Christmas —A Time of Joy and Reflection!

Journal/Website: 
Macon Telegraph
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Sunday, December 29, 2002

Like the months of the year and the days of the week, whose names come down to us from ancient and antediluvian times, many of the symbols of Christmas pre-date Christian times.



Fransini Giraldo is a Colombian girl who dances her own style of Salsa. In this video, she dances to the rhythm of Sonora Carruseles de Colombia, presumably in the Colombia countryside. Published July 16, 2013.