Medical Sentinel

Conrad F. Meier
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 6
Volume Number: 4
November/December 1999

Approximately 2.5 million people in the U.S. --- about 1 percent of the population --- suffer from pre-existing medical conditions making it likely their future medical expenses will be extremely high. While private insurers are ill-equipped to serve this population, 28 state governments play a positive role by chartering non-profit health insurance plans, or HIPs. In order to keep premiums affordable, HIPs are often authorized to impose a small assessment on the premiums earned by private insurers. Capping HIP premiums at no more than 125 to 135 percent of standard individual insurance premiums appears to be a "best practice" for keeping HIPs affordable. HIPs accomplish the social goal of assuring access to quality medical care for those who need it, without the disruptions and negative...


Thomas Dorman, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 5
Volume Number: 4
September/October 1999

Secrecy You have probably been wondering what the banner at the head of this essay is doing; I am coming to it. The production of new goods or services is dependent (as Karl Marx correctly learnt from David Ricardo) on labor, but he systematically suppressed the more important contribution --- that of the inventor and the entrepreneur. This intentional neglect has been amplified by the propaganda machine, I have alluded to, for the purpose of creating a new religion, albeit an atheist religion(1) in which catechisms are repeated, facts are ignored, logic is dismissed, and repetition, threats and inducements are combined in the brainwashing technique that has been so successful in diverting the attention of most of our youth away from the success, and the tools of success in our...


Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, Marwan Y. Nasralla, PhD, Joerg Haier, MD, PhD, Robert Erwin, MD, Nancy L. Nicolson, PhD, Richard Ngwenya, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 5
Volume Number: 4
September/October 1999

ABSTRACT Invasive bacterial infections are associated with several acute and chronic illnesses, including: aerodigestive diseases such as Asthma, Pneumonia, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; rheumatoid diseases, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA); immunosuppression diseases such as HIV-AIDS; genitourinary infections and chronic fatigue illnesses such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Gulf War Illnesses (GWI). It is now apparent that such infections could be (a) causative, (b) cofactors or (c) opportunistic agents in a variety of chronic illnesses. Using Forensic Polymerase Chain Reaction we have looked for the presence of one class of invasive infection (mycoplasmal infections) inside blood leukocyte samples from patients with CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis),...

Tags: medical care

Lawrence R. Huntoon, MD, PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 5
Volume Number: 4
September/October 1999

In view of Dr. Faria's essay, "Is There a Right to Health Care?" in the July/August 1999 issue of the Medical Sentinel,(1) and an editorial which appeared last year in The New England Journal of Medicine,(2) which spoke of a "distributive ethic" akin to corporate socialized medicine, and the collectivist drive toward a right to medical care in America with new proposals for a 28th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to accomplish such a right,(3) I would like to expound on this issue which is of utmost importance for the survival of the profession and what remains of private medical care. We are told in Dr. Kassirer's editorial that physicians who agree to the distributive ethic of managed care essentially become agents of the Plan instead of advocates for the patient.(2) According to...


Thomas Dorman, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 4
Volume Number: 4
July/August 1999

In this essay, I propose to 'tour' the subject of privacy in our civilization, its importance and its pending destruction: Why does privacy matter? What should we expect from its destruction? Finally, does privacy in medical matters have a special significance? I will draw the conclusions that privacy is an extension of property rights; that respect for privacy, a bourgeois concept, is inherent in the success of our civilization and necessary for a thriving middle class. A thriving middle class represents the essence of Western civilization. The frontal assault on privacy is part of an assault on all the values of middle class society. We are living in a maelstrom of this assault. We are losing the battle. The end result is predictable. The end result will be not only a destruction of our...


John E. Gardella, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 4
Volume Number: 4
July/August 1999

In the public debate over legalized euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, opponents of such measures often invoke the history of medicine in Nazi Germany as an example of the danger in these practices. Those who invoke the "Nazi analogy" suggest that the sanctioning of euthanasia could lead to the wholesale destruction of those whose lives are deemed valueless or burdensome to society. Supporters of assisted dying on the other hand refer to the "Nazi albatross," and argue that the modern understanding of euthanasia bears little resemblance to the Nazi program.(1) This paper will review the history of the Nazi euthanasia program, will review its historical roots, and will contrast Nazi "euthanasia" with contemporary proposals for assisted dying. Some writers, including Plato and...


Robert P. Gervais, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 4
Volume Number: 4
July/August 1999

"Health care reform is phased in by population, beginning with children.... Kids First is really a precursor to the new system."(1) The "new system" which is being slowly and incrementally imposed on all of us is none other than socialism. The latter, as will be shown, is not limited to health care. To find evidence of this fact all one need do is peruse various government documents pertaining to daycare centers, schools and its associated school-based clinics, kidcare and labor to uncover that a variety of programs, primarily focused on, but not limited to children, are currently being implemented which will have the effect of propelling us towards the statist goal of a totally managed economy.(2) For statists, total control of society cannot begin too early. That is why California...


Jacob Sullum
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 4
May/June 1999

Last year, when the tobacco companies said they would no longer cooperate with the effort to pass a federal anti-smoking bill, the Clinton administration said it didn't really matter. "We will get bipartisan legislation this year," Secretary of Health and Human Services Donna Shalala told NBC. "There's no question about it, because it's about public health."(1) As it turned out, Shalala was a bit overconfident. But her prediction was certainly plausible, given the way politicians usually behave when the term public health is bandied about. The incantation of that phrase is supposed to preempt all questions and erase all doubts. It tells us to turn off our brains and trust experts like Shalala to think for us. Given that expectation, it may seem rude to ask why, exactly, smoking is a...


Conrad F. Meier
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 4
May/June 1999

In an effort to solve health care problems, we seem to accept the judgment of politicians as a substitute for the judgment of buyers and sellers in a free marketplace when determining what health insurance coverage we need for ourselves. I, for one, would not select to pay insurance for a toupee, in vitro fertilization, sperm bank deposits, or mental health care on a parity with any physical illness. Yet, I pay for them anyway because politicians have made judgments for me by passing health care mandates. The political "snake oil" mandate cure for our health care system does nothing to help and does everything to raise the cost of health care insurance beyond the reach of an ever growing number of citizens. Even though mandates attempt to address some real issues, they are bad social...


Roger Schlafly, PhD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 4
Volume Number: 4
May/June 1999

The use of vaccines to prevent and eradicate diseases like smallpox and poliomyelitis is one of the great successes of modern medicine. But recent developments supply grounds for skepticism about new vaccine initiatives. The corrupting influences are money and politics. In the past ten years, vaccines have become very profitable for drug companies. At one time, the DTP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis) vaccine sold for 10 cents per dose, and the drug manufacturers were dropping out of the market because of low profits and liability problems.(1) But in 1986, Congress sheltered the drug companies from liability. Those injured by vaccines can make claims against a special government fund. There is also a lot more money in the vaccine business. New vaccines are usually patented, and can sell...

Tags: vaccines

Paul Consolazio
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 3
Volume Number: 4
May/June 1999

While shredding papers one evening, an old yellowed paper caught my eye before meeting its grisly fate. It was a thirty-some year old United States history test, which I had given to my students. Question 4 was: "In a constitutional republic, what is the highest office?" I wondered if my students, thirty years later, remembered that they lived in a constitutional republic and that the highest office is that of the private "citizen?" I smiled and imagined them all caught up with children and grandchildren, SUV's, video releases, and CD players. I, on the other hand, am completely out of step with modern technology. The VCR constantly reminds me that its 12:00; my wife repeatedly instructs me on how to operate our microwave oven; and I'm amazed every morning by how they got the stripes in...

Tags: history

Andrew L. Schlafly, Esq.
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 1
Volume Number: 1

Dear Dr. Meyer, I am an avid reader of the Medical Sentinel, and want to compliment you on your recent contribution. Your book review of Sobel's Coolidge, as published in the January/February 1999 issue of the Medical Sentinel, is the best book review I have read in recent memory. In a concise manner, you conveyed a powerful message about the benefits of political inactivity. Your statistical references about Coolidge winning 17 out of 19 elections and using an average sentence length of nearly one-half that of Wilson were fascinating. Interestingly, the English language lacks a proper word to describe the Coolidge approach to government. Walter Lippmann reluctantly used the term "political inactivity," while recognizing that Coolidge "worked hard at inactivity." Two other English words,...


James Bovard
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 2
Volume Number: 4
March/April 1999

Few areas better illustrate the vast sweep of government power than asset forfeiture laws. Forfeiture --- which is simply a nice word for government seizure of private property --- has increased by over 1500 percent since 1979. Federal agents can confiscate private property with no court order and no proof of legal violations. Law enforcement officials love forfeiture laws because a hefty percentage of the takings often go directly to their coffers. These forfeiture laws have sometimes tested the creativity of Supreme Court justices. A 1996 landmark case involved a Detroit steelworker who got nabbed after he picked up a prostitute; cops seized his car. The car turned out to be co-owned with his wife, who did not authorize her husband to use it for any such escapade. But the Detroit city...


Merrill Matthews, PhD and Jack Strayer
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 2
Volume Number: 4
March/April 1999

In 1996 Congress created a demonstration project permitting small employers and the self-employed to establish up to 750,000 tax-free Medical Savings Accounts (MSAs). However, as a result of opposition in Congress, lawmakers imposed a number of restrictions that limit who can purchase MSAs and thwart the ability of MSAs to work properly. Although more than 100,000 qualified MSA policies have been sold, the restrictions have hampered the popularity of MSAs among employers, consumers and insurers and have led to a number of problems that have discouraged MSA sales. As a result, Congress is now considering proposals intended to correct problems in the original legislation and to make Medical Savings Accounts available to every working American, including federal employees.   Current MSA...

Tags: MSA

Thomas Dorman, MD
Article Type: Feature Article
Issue Number: 1
Volume Number: 4
January/February 1999

In contemporary America, we are suffering from a lack of concepts, a philosophical vacuum recognized first by Ayn Rand. Nowhere is this more marked than in the fascist take over of the oldest profession. The ethics of physicians have been wardens of Western traditions since the days when Hippocrates formulated his famous Oath. The personal relationship and direct individual responsibility between physician and patient, the laissez faire capitalist system, was encapsulated in the honorable commitment to the patient, long before Ludwig von Mises wrote Human Action. The relationship between any buyer and purveyor contains what this writer defines as a point of transaction. This concept is introduced to convey the idea of the moment of decision for the exchange. For instance, when I go to the...

Tags: managed care


It is now legend the AAPS legally lanced the secret task force and pulled its secrets...into the sunshine. It destoyed the Health Security Act.


The Oath of Hippocrates
and the Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time


Patients within a managed care system have the illusion there exists a doctor-patient relationship...But in reality, it is the managers who decide how medical care will be given.


Judicial activism...the capricious rule of man rather than the just rule of law.


The largest single problem facing American medicine today is the actions of government...


The lessons of history sagaciously reveal wherever governments have sought to control medical care and medical practice...the results have been as perverse as they have been disastrous.


Children are the centerpiece of the family, the treasure (and renewal) of countless civilizations, but they should not be used flagrantly to advance political agendas...


Prejudice against gun ownership by ordinary citizens is pervasive in the public health community, even when they profess objectivity and integrity in their scientific research.


The infusion of tax free money into the MSA of the working poor give this population tax equity with wealthier persons...


It was when Congress started dabbling in constitutionally forbidden activities that deficit spending produced a national debt!


Does the AMA have a secret pact with HCFA?


The lure of socialism is that it tells the people there is nothing they cannot have and that all social evils will be redressed by the state.


Canada's fatal error — Health Care as a Right!


The Cancer Risk from Low Level Radiation: A Review of Recent Evidence...


...Moreover, the gun control researchers failed to consider and underestimated the protective benefits of firearms.


Vandals at the Gates of Medicine — Have They Been Repulsed or Are They Over the Top?